Trump’s ban on Bump Stocks goes into effect – 10 years in jail, $250,000 fine

 

 

It’s the so-called “Rules” that get a person down. You know, that phone and pen that we thought we had gotten rid of with Trump coming into office. Look, I am no fan of bump stocks. Most people have not a clue as to what they do or don’t do. That is where the hazy part of it becomes a menace to gun owners.

Easy for the non-informed to conclude that while we are at it with the bump stocks, it must have something to do with “semi-automatic” weapons. You know, those nasty looking military type guns. Let’s go after them too. In truth, many hand guns and rifles used for sport are in fact “semi-automatic.”

But now we are talking confiscation. Really? That is the precedent we are going to set?

So how did we get here?

 

The Bump Stock Ban, which took effect on Tuesday, March 26th, 2019 was enacted by the Trump Administration to reclassify bump stock devices as machine guns, and therefore subject to regulation as part of the Gun Control Act of 1968. The transfer or possession of bump stocks became prohibited under this new amendment to the law, subject to penalty of up to 10 years in federal prison and $250,000 in fines for each violation

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday handed President Donald Trump a victory by rejecting for the second time in three days a bid by gun rights activists to block his new ban on “bump stock” attachments that enable semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly.

In the days before the rule change reclassifying the stocks went into effect on March 26, RW was selling the devices for between $105 to $450, making the parts destroyed to comply with the prohibition worth millions. Under the rule, bump stock owners must either destroy the stocks or abandon them at an ATF office without reimbursement for their cost or value.

Nonetheless, a bevy of plaintiffs who are challenging the rule change in federal courts across the country has argued the ban may violate the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment which states that private property can’t be taken for public use without compensation.

A federal judge in Washington D.C. last month responded to that argument that bump stock owners could resort to filing a lawsuit for damages from the government under the Tucker Act after the fact but that factor alone wasn’t enough to halt the ban.

Federal regulators last year estimated there could be as many 520,000 bump stocks in circulation. The ATF has posted instructions online so that owners can destroy their own stocks.

How to Destroy Bump Stocks | Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco … – ATF

Here

 

Download PDF with all diagrams

 

Access the final rule in the Federal Register

 

To comply with a Rule classifying bump stocks as untransferable machine guns, a Texas distributor sent their entire inventory of the now-banned devices to the scrappers.

Fort Worth-based RW Arms on Wednesday brought 60,000 bump stocks to American Shredder where they were destroyed under the supervision of Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agents. The retailer had acquired the remaining inventory of Texas-based bump stock maker Slide Fire Solutions, who had closed their doors last year as the federal government pursued a ban on the once-legal accessory.

 

 

A Texas-based retailer of now-banned bump stocks has transferred about 60,000 of the gun-related items to the federal government to be destroyed. (March 27)

RW Arms

 

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