“Deep State” operative Reality Leigh Winner?

This is an odd thing. Cue up the conspiracy theories. On a strange and bazaar note, why did the contractor she worked for just since Feb 2017, for the most part only hire ex military women in their 20’s?    Interesting to note also that she gave the info to The Intercept who is run by the same guy that Snowden gave stuff to. Maybe Chelsea Manning can explain it. Better yet, in just four short months she just happened to come upon and leak the story that The Intercept published about Russia’s so called interference in last year’s presidential election. Her bailiwick was Afghanistan intelligence. Just two cute by twice.  So let’s take my ride down the rabbit hole. This is the first in a series on this gal:

An NSA document purporting to show Russian military hacker attempts to access a Florida company which makes voter registration software is sent anonymously to The Intercept. A low-level NSA contractor, Reality Winner, above, is arrested almost immediately. What’s wrong with this picture? A lot.

What Happened is… Curious and Curiouser…

Now let’s look at what we know so far about how this happened.

A 25-year-old improbably-named Reality Winner leaves behind a trail long and wide on social media of anti-Trump stuff, including proclaiming herself a member of The Resistance. Never mind, she takes her Top Secret clearance with her out of the Air Force (she had been stationed with the military’s 94th Intelligence Squadron out of Fort Meade, Maryland, co-located with the NSA’s headquarters) and scores a job with an NSA contractor. Despite the lessons of too-much-access the Snowden episode should have taught the NSA, Winner apparently enjoys all sorts of classified documents – her Air Force expertise was in Afghan matters, so it is unclear why she would have access to info on Russia hacking of U.S. domestic companies.

Within only about 90 days of starting her new job, she prints out the one (and only one apparently, why not more?) document in question and mails it to The Intercept. She also uses her work computer inside an NSA facility to write to the Intercept twice about this same time.

Winner has a clearance. She was trained as a Dari, Pashto, and Farsi linguist by the Air Force. She knows how classified stuff works. She has been told repeatedly, as all persons with a clearance are, that her computer, email, printing, and phone are monitored. She mailed the document from Augusta, Georgia, the city where she lives and where the NSA facility is located. She practiced no tradecraft, did nothing to hide her actions and many things to call attention to them. It is very, very unclear why she took the actions she did under those circumstances. We will look at the “maybe” why on Monday. More at Antiwar.com

See the two additional posts that follow:

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Will the real Edward Snowden please stand up and who are your handlers?

The Free Beacon has a story today regarding the NSA and the so called “gaps” that the agency can not or is not willing to address. While they bemoan the P.C. correctness that has infiltrated the organization, I submit the issue is far more serious. I will give you a post I did several years ago. I will let you draw your own conclusions. First from the Beacon:

Until Snowden, the NSA had a reputation as one of the intelligence organizations most dedicated to protecting secrets. But the case exposed gaping holes at the agency, and a House intelligence report says gaps persist years after Snowden fled the country and holed up in Moscow . More at Free Beacon.

We have a guy who never got it together. High School drop out, military failure, three months on the job. William Binney, one of the original whistle-blowers, worked for the NSA for over thirty years before he resigned more than ten years ago over this very same story. Much of the same information about the NSA. For the Binney interview and the development of the Utah spy Center: NSA Utah spy center holds ribbon cutting ceremony-videos .

Hot Air  Even the intel guys can’t figure it out:

Among the questions is how a contract employee at a distant NSA satellite office was able to obtain a copy of an order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, a highly classified document that would presumably be sealed from most employees and of little use to someone in his position.

A former senior NSA official said that the number of agency officials with access to such court orders is “maybe 30 or maybe 40. Not large numbers.”…

Here is NSA Gov Site with their spin on the Spy Center.

Other Sources: NY Times NSA Domestic Spying Center tells the tale of the mass surveillance of Americans. August 22, 2012.

And the girl friend?   From the WH Dossier   Snowden Left Beautiful Girlfriend in the Lurch

Yes, that’s Lindsay Mills, the gal Ed Snowden ditched so he could become the hero of telephone records. Apparently she’s a ballet trained, pole dancing fountain of pulchritude who blogs about her life at “L’s Journey,” was still up the last I looked.

Jim Hoft at Gateway Pundit got a glimpse of the website before it went off-line for awhile, finding the latest post in which she says she’s now “without a compass.”

I gather Snowden took the compass so he could find his way to Hong Kong. (Alert: sound is very loud when playing clip)

Lindsay Mills

Warning- Sound is very loud in the clip. Here she is doing her dance thing.

The Guardian on Monday shares more about the young man who it says was behind last week’s leaks concerning National Security Agency programs that sweep up data on phone calls and Internet activity. It paints a portrait of a mediocre student with a GED degree who joined the Army in 2003, but was discharged after breaking his legs in a training accident. Snowden says he later wound up working with the CIA and then a contractor because he’s skilled at computer programming.

The Washington Post, which along with the Guardian published a report last week based on documents allegedly leaked by Snowden, adds that:

“With wire glasses, short, dark hair and a thin goatee, he maintains an academic look. Yet he never completed his coursework at a community college in Maryland, only later obtaining his GED — an unusually light education for someone who would advance in the intelligence ranks.

H/T: NPR

NSA stores metadata on millions of Americans for one year

Let’s not let this story get away from us. The IRS scandal pales in comparison to this one.  First an update that indeed every keystroke that every single American makes, the NSA is keeping track. Cass Sunstein and Richard Clarke have their long evil fingers in this. And the best part:

“This tool offers the ability to export the data in a variety of formats, as well as create various charts to assist in pattern-of-life development.” ED: In other words,looking at any of those annoying Tea Party folks, gun clingers, or the vast right-wing conspiracy types will be a nice start.

Via Guardian:

The National Security Agency is storing the online metadata of millions of internet users for up to a year, regardless of whether or not they are persons of interest to the agency, top-secret documents reveal.

Metadata provides a record of almost anything a user does online, from browsing history – such as map searches and websites visited – to account details, email activity, and even some account passwords. This can be used to build a detailed picture of an individual’s life.

The Obama administration has repeatedly stated that the NSA keeps only the content of messages and communications of people it is intentionally targeting – but internal documents reveal the agency retains vast amounts of metadata.

An introductory guide to digital network intelligence for NSA field agents, included in documents disclosed by former contractor Edward Snowden, describes the agency’s metadata repository, codenamed Marina. Any computer metadata picked up by NSA collection systems is routed to the Marina database, the guide explains. Phone metadata is sent to a separate system.

“The Marina metadata application tracks a user’s browser experience, gathers contact information/content and develops summaries of target,” the analysts’ guide explains. “This tool offers the ability to export the data in a variety of formats, as well as create various charts to assist in pattern-of-life development.”

The guide goes on to explain Marina’s unique capability: “Of the more distinguishing features, Marina has the ability to look back on the last 365 days’ worth of DNI metadata seen by the Sigint collection system, regardless whether or not it was tasked for collection.”

Keep reading

Earlier posts for more on the “review panel” Obama packs NSA review panel with cronies and James Clapper and his NSA ‘task force’ review panel Part two

The President called for the creation of an “independent” task force with “outside experts” to make sure “there absolutely is no abuse in terms of how these surveillance technologies are used.” Less than two days later, the White House followed up with a press release announcing the task force would be led by Gen. Clapper and would also report to him.

What’s even worse: the task force was not tasked with looking at any abuse. It was told to focus on how to “protect our national security and advance our foreign policy.” And just this week, ABC News reported the task force will be full of thorough Washington insiders—not “outside experts.”

For instance, one (Richard Clarke) has advocated the Department of Homeland Security be allowed to scan all Internet traffic going in and out of the US.

And another, while a noted legal scholar on regulatory issues, has written a paper (Cass Sunstein) about government campaigns to infiltrate online groups and activists. In one good act, the White House selected Peter Swire to be on the task force. Swire is a professor at Georgia Tech and has served as the White House’s first ever Chief Privacy Officer. Recently, he signed an amicus brief in a case against the NSA spying by the Electronic Privacy Information Center arguing that the NSA’s telephony metadata program is illegal under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act. Despite this, and at the end of a day, a task force led by General Clapper full of insiders—and not directed to look at the extensive abuse—will never get at the bottom of the unconstitutional spying.

Full story over at EFF and why this whole thing is a sham.

The  Video below: Clapper To Oversee The NSA Surveillance Review?

I mean REALLY? Oh wow. Let’s have the director of the National Security, to oversee the ‘outside experts’ overseeing the NSA, you are right, can’t make this stuff up!

Obama has no interest in Snowden, Putin ends 1987 arms treaty, what could go wrong?

All one can say is that Obama is clueless in how diplomacy works. After warnings from Kerry and Feinstein that lives may be at risk with the information that Snowden has, Obama now downgrades him to just a 29-year-old hacker. Does Obama realize what a jackass he makes himself and the United States look like?

Meanwhile, Russia just announced it is ditching Reagan’s 1987 arms treaty.

Weaponry: As the commander in chief calls for a one-third  reduction in our nuclear arsenal, Russia builds new midrange missile banned  under a 1987 arms treaty. How’s that “reset” button working out, Mr.  President?

Russia’s playing host to Edward Snowden, arguably a traitor with secrets to  share with Moscow and a danger to our national security interests, is a slap in  the face. So is the testing of the Yars-M ballistic missile, a weapon with a  range prohibited by the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty.

Read More At Investor’s Business Daily: IBD

One cannot but be stunned by this man’s arrogance.

“My continued expectation is that Russia or other countries that have talked about potentially providing Mr. Snowden asylum recognize that they are a part of an international community and they should be abiding by international law,” Obama said, noting that the U.S. doesn’t have a formal extradition treaty with Russia.

“I get why it’s a fascinating story,” Obama added. “I’m sure there will be a made-for-TV movie somewhere down the line.”

DAKAR, Senegal — The United States won’t be scrambling military jets or engaging in high-level diplomatic bartering to get National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden extradited to the U.S., President Barack Obama said Thursday.

Dismissing him as “a 29-year-old hacker,” Obama sought to downplay the international chase for Snowden, lowering the temperature of an issue that has already raised tensions between the U.S. and uneasy partners Russia and China.

“I’m not going to have one case with a suspect who we’re trying to extradite suddenly be elevated to the point where I’ve got to start doing wheeling and dealing and trading on a whole host of other issues, simply to get a guy extradited so he can face the justice system,” Obama said at a joint news conference with Senegal’s President Macky Sall.

Obama said he hadn’t personally called either Russian President Vladimir Putin or Chinese President Xi Jinping to request their cooperation.

“I shouldn’t have to,” he declared.

More at Huffington Post

Echelon – Listening in to your phone calls and reading your emails

The absolute absurdity of the hearings regarding the spying on Americans. All of the participants lying through their teeth, and the Congressmen and women feigning outrage of what all of them have to know, that indeed our government does do massive surveillance. Even better, we now have this character Snowden supposedly revealing these secrets that have been out for over a decade. It goes back to the 1970’s, but let us pick up the story in 1999 and 2001. My tin foil rests its case.

Guardian Tuesday 29 May 2001

So what’s the problem with Echelon? It isn’t only industry that’s at risk. The report says that in the process of industrial spying, Echelon is eavesdropping on millions of daily communications between ordinary people.

The worry is that Echelon could become a cyber secret police, eroding individuals’ right to privacy. The MEPs have warned the government that Britain could be in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights because of its participation in Echelon.

As National Security Agency expert James Bamford explains in his book Body of Secrets: “The real issue is whether Echelon is doing away with individual privacy, a basic human right.”

BBC  back on 3 November, 1999:

Imagine a global spying network that can eavesdrop on every single phone call, fax or e-mail, anywhere on the planet.

It sounds like science fiction, but it’s true.

Two of the chief protagonists – Britain and America – officially deny its existence. But the BBC has confirmation from the Australian Government that such a network really does exist and politicians on both sides of the Atlantic are calling for an inquiry.

On the North Yorkshire moors above Harrogate they can be seen for miles, but still they are shrouded in secrecy. Around 30 giant golf balls, known as radomes, rise from the US military base at Menwith Hill.

Linked to the NSA

Inside is the world’s most sophisticated eavesdropping technology, capable of listening-in to satellites high above the earth.

Menwith

Facility is said to be capable of 2m intercepts per hour

The base is linked directly to the headquarters of the US National Security Agency (NSA) at Fort Mead in Maryland, and it is also linked to a series of other listening posts scattered across the world, like Britain’s own GCHQ.

The power of the network, codenamed Echelon, is astounding.

Every international telephone call, fax, e-mail, or radio transmission can be listened to by powerful computers capable of voice recognition. They home in on a long list of key words, or patterns of messages. They are looking for evidence of international crime, like terrorism.

Open Oz

The network is so secret that the British and American Governments refuse to admit that Echelon even exists. But another ally, Australia, has decided not to be so coy.

The man who oversees Australia’s security services, Inspector General of Intelligence and Security Bill Blick, has confirmed to the BBC that their Defence Signals Directorate (DSD) does form part of the network.

“As you would expect there are a large amount of radio communications floating around in the atmosphere, and agencies such as DSD collect those communications in the interests of their national security”, he said.

Asked if they are then passed on to countries like Britain and America, he said: “They might be in certain circumstances.”

But the system is so widespread all sorts of private communications, often of a sensitive commercial nature, are hoovered up and analysed.

Journalist Duncan Campbell has spent much of his life investigating Echelon. In a report commissioned by the European Parliament he produced evidence that the NSA snooped on phone calls from a French firm bidding for a contract in Brazil. They passed the information on to an American competitor, which won the contract.

“There’s no safeguards, no remedies, ” he said, “There’s nowhere you can go to say that they’ve been snooping on your international communications. Its a totally lawless world.”

Breaking the silence

Both Britain and America deny allegations like this, though they refuse to comment further. But one former US army intelligence officer has broken the code of silence.

Colonel Dan Smith told the BBC that while this is feasible, it is not official policy: “Technically they can scoop all this information up, sort through it, and find what it is that might be asked for,” he said. “But there is no policy to do this specifically in response to a particular company’s interests.”

Legislators on both sides of the Atlantic are beginning to sit up and take notice. Republican Congressman Bob Barr has persuaded congress to open hearings into these and other allegations.

In December he is coming to Britain to raise awareness of the issue. In an interview with the BBC he accused the NSA of conducting a broad “dragnet” of communications, and “invading the privacy of American citizens.”

He is joined in his concerns by a small number of politicians In Britain. Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker has tabled a series of questions about Menwith Hill, but has been met with a wall of silence.

“There’s no doubt it’s being used as a listening centre,” he said, “There’s no doubt it’s being used for US interests, and I’m not convinced that Britain’s interests are being best served by this.”

Edward Snowden: The great spy hoax of the century?

Oh the outrage. The world is in a tizzy over the supposed leak of “Top Secret” information. But the story never added up. From the beginning. First, other than a few screen shots he provided, almost all of this information has been out in the blogosphere for well over a year. The Guardian says there is more to come. We shall see. If more to come was it from him? We have a guy who never got it together. High School drop out, military failure, three months on the job. William Binney, one of the original whistle-blowers, worked for the NSA for over thirty years before he resigned more than ten years ago over this very same story. Exactly the same information. For the Binney interview and the development of the Utah spy Center: NSA Utah spy center holds ribbon cutting ceremony-videos Two posts today.

Hot Air  Even the intel guys can’t figure it out:

Among the questions is how a contract employee at a distant NSA satellite office was able to obtain a copy of an order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, a highly classified document that would presumably be sealed from most employees and of little use to someone in his position.

A former senior NSA official said that the number of agency officials with access to such court orders is “maybe 30 or maybe 40. Not large numbers.”…

Here is NSA Gov Site with their spin on the Spy Center.

Other Sources: NY Times NSA Domestic Spying Center tells the tale of the mass surveillance of Americans. August 22, 2012.

And the girl friend?   From the WH Dossier   Snowden Left Beautiful Girlfriend in the Lurch

Yes, that’s Lindsay Mills, the gal Ed Snowden ditched so he could become the hero of telephone records. Apparently she’s a ballet trained, pole dancing fountain of pulchritude who blogs about her life at “L’s Journey,” which has either been overwhelmed by traffic or taken down.

Jim Hoft at Gateway Pundit got a glimpse of the website before it went off-line, finding the latest post in which she says she’s now “without a compass.”

I gather Snowden took the compass so he could find his way to Hong Kong. (Alert: sound is very loud when playing clip)

Lindsay Mills

The Guardian on Monday shares more about the young man who it says was behind last week’s leaks concerning National Security Agency programs that sweep up data on phone calls and Internet activity. It paints a portrait of a mediocre student with a GED degree who joined the Army in 2003, but was discharged after breaking his legs in a training accident. Snowden says he later wound up working with the CIA and then a contractor because he’s skilled at computer programming.

The Washington Post, which along with the Guardian published a report last week based on documents allegedly leaked by Snowden, adds that:

“With wire glasses, short, dark hair and a thin goatee, he maintains an academic look. Yet he never completed his coursework at a community college in Maryland, only later obtaining his GED — an unusually light education for someone who would advance in the intelligence ranks.

H/T: NPR

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