NSA illegally obtains calls & texts, claims ‘error’ Again!

 

 

The NSA will never stop its collecting everything on everyone. If you have not seen the interview of Former NSA chief William Binney which I have included, do take the time to take a look. He reveals the “Stellar Wind” project and it should worry us all. Yet our somnolent congress does nothing.

The NSA has been caught improperly collecting Americans’ phone data yet again, just months after a similar incident forced them to (supposedly) purge hundreds of millions of records captured without FISA authorization.

The agency unlawfully slurped up a “larger than expected” volume of call and text records from one US telecom provider under the metadata-collection program known as Section 215, according to a document obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union as part of its ongoing lawsuit against the agency. The heavily redacted file does not reveal which company was affected, or how many of its “call detail records” were illegally collected between October 3 and 12, 2018.

The NSA never outs themselves and admits ‘We made a mistake’ – it only comes to light when the ACLU or some group sues,” Swann told RT.

If there is no accountability for those who continue to break the law – because that’s what they’re doing – then why would they ever stop doing that?

 

 

The NSA has stated they wouldn’t mind dropping Section 215, however, president Trump has suggested he’d like it to continue indefinitely. 

Former NSA chief William Binney confirmed that the agency is only letting it go of the controversial program Section 215 because they have something much more sinister going on.

“There is no oversight of the upstream program,” Binney told RT, referring to an NSA program that collects not only phone records but emails, “chatter,” and “everything on the fiber optic network.” Upstream is “the major program that’s copying the collection of bulk data on everybody, not just in the United States but on the planet.”

The filmmaker Laura Poitras profiles William Binney, a 32-year veteran of the National Security Agency who helped design a top-secret program he says is broadly collecting Americans’ personal data.

 

 

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Be sure and visit  WhatFingerNews  A great site for all the news.

 

 

 

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Biden Says Don’t Trust a Spying President

Where to even begin. But let us trot out a clip of Biden for old time’s sake, and spin on over to what has to be one of the more bizarre answers from our master of intelligence, Clapper, on why he lied to Congress. Even though he knew ahead of time the question before the hearing, and was given a chance to “modify” his answer after his “misstatement”.

We also now know that Clapper knew he was lying. In an interview with NBC’s Andrea Mitchell that aired this past Sunday, Clapper was asked why he answered Wyden the way he did. He replied:

I thought, though in retrospect, I was asked [a] ‘when are you going to … stop beating your wife’ kind of question, which is … not answerable necessarily by a simple yes or no. So I responded in what I thought was the most truthful, or least untruthful, manner by saying, ‘No.’ ”

Very original answer!

On Special Report with Bret Baier, a video of Joe Biden from May 12, 2006 was discussed. In this video, Biden told us to not trust a president who spies

Meanwhile back at Slate they are calling for Clappers head:

Fire James Clapper

The Director of National Intelligence lied to Congress about NSA surveillance. What else will he lie about?

Back at an open congressional hearing on March 12, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) asked Clapper, “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Clapper replied, “No sir … not wittingly.” As we all now know, he was lying.

Read the whole thing at Slate if you want to have a chuckle.

Just a part from JAMES CLAPPER’S  “metaphor”: interview, well worth the full read to see how his head spins.

I understand that. But first let me say that I and everyone in the intelligence community all– who are also citizens, who also care very deeply about our– our privacy and civil liberties, I certainly do.

So let me say that at the outset. I think a lot of what people are– are reading and seeing in the media is a lot of hyper– hyperbole.

A metaphor I think might be helpful for people to understand this is to think of a huge library with literally millions of volumes of books in it, an electronic library. Seventy percent of those books are on bookcases in the United States, meaning that the bulk of the of the world’s infrastructure, communications infrastructure is in the United States.

There are no limitations on the customers who can use this library. Many and millions of innocent people doing min– millions of innocent things use this library, but there are also nefarious people who use it. Terrorists, drug cartels, human traffickers, criminals also take advantage of the same technology. So the task for us in the interest of preserving security and preserving civil liberties and privacy is to be as precise as we possibly can be when we go in that library and look for the books that we need to open up and actually read. You think of the li– and by the way, all these books are arranged randomly. They’re not arranged by subject or topic matter.

And they’re constantly changing. And so when we go into this library, first we have to have a library card, the people that actually do this work. Which connotes their training and certification and recertification. So when we pull out a book, based on its essentially is– electronic Dewey Decimal System, which is zeroes and ones, we have to be very precise about which book we’re picking out. And if it’s one that belongs to the– was put in there by an American citizen or a U.S. person. We ha– we are under strict court supervision and have to get stricter– and have to get permission to actually– actually look at that.

So the notion that we’re trolling through everyone’s emails and voyeuristically reading them, or listening to everyone’s phone calls is on its face absurd. We couldn’t do it even if we wanted to. And I assure you, we don’t want to.

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