South Korea’s Moon over Obama

 

Moon meets with Putin

Post by Mustang

Gordon Chang’s recent article at the Gatestone Institute is nothing if not instructive.  Reading the post, titled “Will North Korea Take Over South Korea?” … one wonders how the people of South Korea, given their history over the past 70 years, can possibly accept President Moon’s treasonous behavior as their chief executive —but then, the efforts of this man to dismantle republican democracy in South Korea does sound awfully similar to the presidency of public enemy number one, Barack Obama.

I still shake my head every time I think of Obama’s election … not once, but twice.  In fact, there are so many similarities between Obama and Moon that one begins to think about conspiracies of global proportions.

You can read the article for yourself, but here are a few of his salient points:

  • ·       While visiting North Korea, President Moon went out of his way to downplay the legitimacy of the country he was elected to represent;
  • ·       Since becoming president in 2017, President Moon has undermined his country’s democracy in tangible ways, including the use of broadcast media to suppress dissenting views, while at the same time promoting those of North Korea.
  • ·    President Moon ordered the dismantling of the South Korean military, including the removal of defenses along likely invasion and infiltration routes.
  • ·       In North Korea, President Moon recently stood mute while Kim Jung Un referred to the South Korean people as “My people.”
  • ·     President Moon has long advocated unification of the Korean Peninsula; what no one expected is that he has been working overtime to make South Korea more compatible with the authoritarian nature of the North Korean state.  As but one example, Moon insists that the term “liberal” be removed from the concept of constitutional democracy.

So why are the people of South Korea standing idly by?

I suppose for the same reason our people thought that electing Barack Obama was a wise choice —on two occasions.  South Korea society today mirrors that of the United States: it is beset with social issues, which include alcoholism, substance abuse, over-fascination with social media and video games, destruction of core family values, and a sense that their nation’s policies are of no concern.  Being lulled to sleep by drugs and technology would seem to a windfall for Kim Jung Un.

Does any of this sound familiar?  Why does this matter?  Why should anyone care what South Korea does?

Does it matter because 34,000 Americans gave up their lives during the Korean War?  Does it matter because five-thousand Americans suffered as prisoners of war in North Korea and China —and that not all of them came home?  Since the Korean armistice (a peace treaty was never signed), the American taxpayer has paid billions of dollars helping to improve South Korea’s infrastructure and subsidizing South Korea’s national defense … a treaty obligation since 1950.

On the other hand, I’m not sure that there is anything the United States can do about President Moon’s treasonous behavior.  Maybe the wise course of action is to do nothing —let the Koreans decide their own fate, come hell or high water.  The American people seem incapable of dealing with their own political system much less those of another country so far from our shores … and you know, this does suggest to me that Obama achieved most of his goals as chief executive: to make fundamental changes to the United States of America.

Is it in America’s long-term interests to abandon global leadership?

Should we hit them in the old pocket book by refusing to buy Korean cars?

Well, such a remarkable repudiation of South Korea’s present leadership would suggest that we Americans have the chutzpah to act on our principles.

Or that we even have such things as principles.

 I would be interested in reader’s views.

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North Korea is sitting on $6 trillion in mineral resources

 

So Rocket Man, Chairman Kim Jong Un, has a whole lot of stuff sitting under his earth’s crust. While everyone depicts North Korea as this down and out country, it turns out the story is far more complicated with Billions of dollars worth of rare earth minerals for one. It has been claimed that it would be such burden for South Korea should these two ever get together. Not true apparently. Plus it has beautiful beaches that Trump would love to develop!:

 

It has long been regarded as a poor country.

But as it turns out North Korea is a lot richer than we thought, or at the very least has the potential to be.

North Korea has mineral resources estimated to be worth at least $6 trillion, according to Quartz, and the secretive state is sitting on a vast array of mineral resources which remains largely untapped including iron, gold, magnesite, zinc, copper, limestone, molybdenum and graphite.

Its bedrock also holds a large amount of metals needed to make smartphones and other technological products.

But while the isolated nation might be rich in underground resources, taking advantage of the buried treasure this remains another issue.

But a 2012 estimate by a South Korean research institute valued its mineral wealth as high as $10 trillion, The Economist reported.

More at  New York Post

Trump’s total now: Brings home a total of 14 wrongly detained Americans so far

So easy to forget what our man Trump is out there doing every day as the Democrats and  MSM continue it’s relentless attacks on him. So far, up to 14.

Peace Through Strength. Respect for the USA.

 

U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration — less than a year and a half into its tenure — has helped secure the release of at least 14 Americans, including three children born in captivity to an American woman and her Canadian husband held by the Afghan Taliban and al-Qaeda-linked Haqqani Network.

 

  • Kim Dong Chul, Kim Hak Song, and Tony Kim: All three Korean-Americans, accused by the Kim Jong-un regime of anti-state activities. The North Korean regime imprisoned them for terms ranging between one and two years. The three young men are expected to reach U.S. soil in the early hours of Thursday.
  • Aya Hijazi: The Trump administration negotiated the April 2018 release of aid worker Aya Hijazi, imprisoned in Egypt for three years. She was liberated soon after a meeting between President Trump and his Egyptian counterpart Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to secure Hijazi’s release. Ultimately, the Egyptian judicial system acquitted her of charges of child abuse that human rights groups and U.S. officials deemed baseless.
  • Sabrina De Sousa: The Trump administration won the release in March 2018 of the former CIA agent who was scheduled to be extradited from Portugal to Italy over the kidnapping of radical Egyptian Muslim cleric Osama Mustapha Hassan Nasr, also known as Abu Omar. Referring to her release, Former Rep. Pete Hoekstra (R-MI), a spokesman for De Sousa, told Fox News, “I can confirm that this wouldn’t have happened without extraordinary help from the Trump administration.”
  • UCLA Basketball Players LiAngelo Ball, Cody Riley, and Jalen Hill: In November 2017, President Trump personally took credit for asking his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping to release the three players held in the communist country for shoplifting. Chinese authorities accused them of stealing designer sunglasses from a Louis Vuitton store. President Trump wrote on Twitter after the players returned home, “You’re welcome, go out and give a big Thank You to President Xi Jinping of China who made your release possible.”
  • American Caitlan Coleman, her Canadian husband Joshua Boyle, and their three children: The Taliban and al-Qaeda terrorist group the Haqqani Network, deemed by the Pentagon as the top threat facing U.S. troops in Afghanistan, kidnapped the couple in October 2012. Haqqani terrorists held them for five years until their release in October 2017. The couple had three children while they were held captive.
  • Otto Warmbier: The Trump administration negotiated the release of the 21-year-old American student in June 2017 after he was detained by the Kim regime for 17 months for allegedly stealing a propaganda poster in his hotel. He died shortly after he was returned to the United States in a coma.
  • Sandy Phan-Gillis: Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) credited President Trump for providing “leadership” in communist China’s decision to “deport” the Houston businesswoman in April 2017. The Chinese judicial system had sentenced her to three and a half years in prison on espionage charges.

As of October 2017, there reportedly were (Story at the New Yorker- good read) about 20 Americans held captive by militant groups around the world or foreign governments. The Trump administration has liberated about eight since. More at

Breitbart

Flashback -Hillary Clinton Says President Trump’s “Cavalier Threats” to North Korea are “Dangerous, Short-Sighted”

 

The left-wing media is in a real tizzy. I caught Morning Joe this morning… you know I just had to do it and they of course were foaming at the mouth that Trump didn’t go through the proper channels before agreeing to a meeting with Rocket Man. Yes, that sure has been working out swell hasn’t it?

Bill Clinton signed a nuclear deal with North Korea and gave them $4 billionto sign the deal.

The North Koreans lied and broke the agreement almost immediately.

But that didn’t stop Hillary Clinton from spouting off in October 2017 against the American president during her trip to South Korea.

(And Hillary sure was a winner with her Arab Spring and finishing Gadhafi off. Just for the record.)

Hillary Clinton says that ‘cavalier’ threats to start war on the Korean peninsula are ‘dangerous and short-sighted’, and urges the United States to get all parties to the negotiating table. ‘Picking fights with Kim Jong-un just puts a smile on his face,’ she says.

Gateway Pundit

Now for a Funny!

In an attempt to criticize President Trump for how he is handling the escalating tension with North Korea, Hillary Clinton again embarrassed herself by demonstrating she knows little about the Korean peninsula. During an interview on “The Rachel Maddow Show,” she said, “South Korea is literally, you know, within miles of the border with North Korea.” Of course, South Korea shares it’s northern border — the most dangerous border in the world — with North Korea. It is not miles away.

Hillary Clinton in S. Korea says all parties should negotiate,Trump threats dangerous

 

I know we are sick of Hillary posts and I had determined I would never post another one. This one troubles me greatly. It is the kind of thing where her performance takes it to another level. One where you really want to stick it to her. Mind you, she is sitting in Seoul, South Korea where she makes these remarks. Considering it was her husband that was the fool that did the wonderful negotiation that let them have a bomb, sure, let’s go back at it. Not satisfied money-grubbing and plundering Americans, let’s try to gin up the Korean thing and upset South Korea and build anger and fear regarding Trump’s Korean policy.

Hillary Clinton Says Threats Of War With North Korea Are ‘Dangerous And Short-Sighted’

Hillary Clinton said on Wednesday that “cavalier” threats to start war on the Korean peninsula are “dangerous and short-sighted”, urging the United States to get all parties to the negotiating table.

Hillary Clinton displays her knowledge of Geography

It’s getting old, Hillary breeches again for another onslaught in explaining “What Happened.” For anyone who questions what when wrong for Hillary, this might be an example.
In an attempt to criticize President Trump for how he is handling the escalating tension with North Korea, Hillary Clinton again embarrassed herself by demonstrating she knows little about the Korean peninsula. During an interview on “The Rachel Maddow Show,” she said, “South Korea is literally, you know, within miles of the border with North Korea.” Of course, South Korea shares it’s northern border — the most dangerous border in the world — with North Korea. It is not miles away.

A British Perspective on options regarding North Korea

By Mustang

A writer by the name of Mark Almond recently got a four-page spread in The Daily Mail that addressed “western” options vis-à-vis North Korea.  Beyond the usual backdrop to the problem, which essentially ignored any details about the appeasements offered to the NORKS by Bill Clinton, Almond offered up a few “alternatives.”  Personally, I’m not sure why the Mail would want to inform North Korea about our options —it appears to give some aid and comfort to the enemy, but I nevertheless found his options somewhat interesting.  His options were:

Diplomacy —treat North Korea as an equal (not as a rogue), but do try to refrain from Washington’s previous appeasements.  Surprisingly, he urged President Trump to demand verification of any halt to nuclear weapons development.  I laugh … how does one verify such a thing?  Cross my heart and hope to die doesn’t seem to be working very well.

Sanctions —allowing that Kim Jung Un cannot be “sweet-talked” into behaving himself as a responsible national leader, we should perhaps impose further sanctions upon the North Korean regime. Personally, I’m not aware that any of our previous sanctions ever worked.  Maybe we should threaten to send Jimmy Carter to North Korea.  That might work.

Limited strike —well, once more, I’m not sure that limited strikes serve much purpose beyond reducing America’s arsenal of air-delivered munitions.  North Korea is a mountainous country and I have no doubt that Kim Jung Un has a plush underground bunker where he can avoid any discomforts from American/South Korean airstrikes.  I do suspect that the American taxpayer paid for these bunkers, but then this is what happens when the American people elect a Clinton to the presidency.

Full Invasion —right.  The United States of America is already over-committed to the Middle East and without the massive participation of North Korea’s neighbors (South Korea and Japan) this option would appear to be laughable on its face.

Assassination —Although I do not think there are any Americans who are Democrats, the Democratic party in America would almost certainly oppose such attempts, unless it was Debbie Wasserman Schultz who first came up with the idea.  How should we assassinate Kim Jung Un?  Well, beyond hiring the Israelis to do it for us, I don’t see how this is a realistic possibility —unless we were to find out that Fat Kim loves M&Ms.  In that case, we’ve got him by the short-hairs.

An American Nuclear Strike —I suspect would could never get away with this.  Gore would be absolutely apoplectic, and don’t we need to protect Al Gore as a national treasure?  I wondered why a British fellow is attempting to encourage an American nuclear strike.  Hmmm.  Presently, North Korea has somewhere in the neighborhood of sixty nuclear bombs.  If he only got off one of these in his own defense, it could get messy.  On the other hand, does Un even know where Guam is?

Pressure on China —by far the most logical of all suggestions, with some modification by Machiavellian me.  So far, the Chinese have not appeared much disposed to reigning in their little fat tyrant, but what if we offered this suggestion via the New England Journal of Medicine: North Koreans are as nutritionally balanced and tasty as roast duck?

My personal opinion is that it is a darn good thing Mr. Almond isn’t working for the British Defense agency.  On the other hand, America has all these MOABs sitting around gathering dust.  What if we simply delivered one of these for every square inch of North Korea and made it an UN-limited strike?

I don’t know … I’m old, and confused most of the time.  What do Bunkerville reader’s think our options are?

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