Italy Tells E.U. Head Where to Go – Elects Meloni, Defies Threats


 

One of the most dangerous women in politics, von der Leyden wants to do to Italy what she appears to have accomplished in the Netherlands. She does not get enough attention. To no avail. Italy just voted in the first woman candidate. On Sunday Italy voted in populist candidate Georgia Meloni.

European Commission Chief Ursula von der Leyen threatened Italy last week before their national elections. Von der Leyen warned Italian voters that the European Union has ways to deal with rogue states that represent their people and ignore the globalist agenda.

Georgia Meloni 

Source: Gateway Pundit

In July I posted 

European Union Fires the shot to start WWIII in the Netherlands

 

The Netherlands are about to lose many of their farms by confiscation. At least an attempt at that is in the process. How did the Netherlands get here? “Essentially, the EU has now achieved what Kaiser Wilhelm and Adolf Hitler failed to achieve between 1914 – 1945”.  The Netherland is the number two exporter of food, second only to the U.S. While we keep hearing about Ukraine as the breadbasket, it is the Dutch who lead.

To understand let’s start with the European Union and their Court of Justice. The court sounding quite similar in many ways to the United States secret FISA courts. The E.U. could not have come to where they are without the Court of Justice.

The E.U. Court of Justice

We don’t know much about the inner workings of the Court, beyond what its statute and rules of procedure tell us.2 The deliberations are secret and only ruling judges can attend. Dissenting opinions are not made public.3 The Court has been compared to ‘a black hole, from which nothing – except very brief, magisterial rulings with no hint of disagreement among the judges – can escape’ (Pollack 2017: 602). Secrecy was built into its DNA: one working language (French) was reportedly adopted to prevent that interpreters would attend the secret deliberations (Saurugger and Terpan 2017: 14).

I can attest to that having attempted to read their cases. None are in English.

How powerful is ECJ?

Not only did the ECJ confirm the Van Gend en Loos ruling, it established that European law always supersedes national law since states transferred rights to the community. This has become known as the principle of supremacy, and together with direct effect it gives constitutional status to EU law.

Keep reading

Nov 13, 2020 For those who are interested in a read that is totally in the weeds I offer the following:


Guardians of Public Value
 pp 135–159

The European Court of Justice: Guardian of European Integration

Here is the home page to start

Abstract

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) was founded in 1952. At that time, few observers would have predicted a future of a powerful institution, shaping Europe’s faith through its rulings. But that is exactly what happened. After a slow start, the ECJ gradually evolved into one of the most important institutions of the European Union. This chapter describes how this little court shrouded in secrecy managed to climb the institutional ladder. It analyses the role of institutional leadership, the relation between the ECJ and its authorizing environment, the near-existential crisis it faced in the 1970s, and the potential vulnerabilities that have grown over the years.

 

The best of the world’s swamp.

 

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31 Responses to “Italy Tells E.U. Head Where to Go – Elects Meloni, Defies Threats”

  1. annie Says:

    The news is exhausting lately. I am afraid the pendulum is about to swing in the opposite direction and that too might be as extreme. We never seem to get to the middle but swing wildly from side to side.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      We sure are finished if we continue as we are… The media is portraying Meloni as a radical right wing crazy.. I have listened to a number of her speeches and it doesn’t seem radical to me. Supporting parents, schools, religion to the left is crazy.

      Like

  2. Baysider Says:

    What “tools” would those be Fuhrer Von der Leyen? Starvation, as in the Netherlands? Or perhaps Zyklon B? Has it ever dawned on anyone that anti-Christ could be a woman?

    Liked by 4 people

  3. markone1blog Says:

    I hope that the Italians follow through (as did the Polish and Hungarians). Don’t forget that the Italians have been so crippled by the socialist model that their young do not reproduce at a replacement level and their old are increasingly being abandoned by the government. Hence, their follow-through may be incomplete.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Mustang Says:

      Isn’t Von der Leyen the genius who came up with the idea of imposing sanctions on Russia for its invasion of Ukraine? Um … how are those sanctions working out so far? Winter coming and what? No fuel? European fuel costs in the gazillions? Oh yeah, she’s a genius, all right. What I can’t figure out is why someone from Poland doesn’t go over to her house and whack her …

      Liked by 3 people

      • markone1blog Says:

        The following video, while a little backwater, seems to fit in well with today’s conversation:

        Liked by 3 people

      • Baysider Says:

        Mark – good find. How many budding Marxists who scream “Nazi” at anyone with ideas they don’t like would even recognize the voice?

        Sanctions in winter? We shall see what we shall see. My guess is there are nefarious sorts (probably many of them) hoping for a hard, cold winter. The trap is sprung!

        Liked by 3 people

      • bunkerville Says:

        It was a striking military maneuver Mustang…. even I a neophyte in such matters ,see the flaw in the logic.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mustang Says:

        In 1806 in a war unleashed by the French Revolution, when Napoleon attempted to impose a strangling shipping blockade on Great Britain, Britain responded with Orders in Council that likewise tried to keep vital supplies from reaching French ports. The sanctions damaged both economies and hurt the ordinary people of Britain and France, but worse, they were largely ineffective for all of their geopolitical drama. Napoleon’s Continental System succeeded only in souring relations between France and Alexander I of Russia, which led to Napoleon’s disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812, the Congress of Vienna (1814), World War I in 1914, and World War II in 1939.

        Eventually, the Napoleonic Wars (1803 – 1815) descended into a struggle for national survival, and, as the battles raged on without resolution and each country attempted to starve its adversary into submission, an infant United States got caught between what Jefferson called the sharks of the ocean (Britain) and the lions on the land (France). America’s thriving shipping industry was preyed upon by both European belligerents. The cargoes and ships of non-involved countries were seized, crews were threatened, detained, and roughed up, and the English frequently impressed (i.e., kidnapped) American sailors for service in the British navy. Both France and England engaged in coercive (and sometimes violent) maritime activities that amounted to acts of war against the United States. Both European nations viewed American protests with haughty indifference — the same way Washington looks upon the “will of the people” today.

        To President Jefferson, who declared that “peace is my passion,” commercial retaliation seemed like a valuable alternative to war. Jefferson — the enlightenment idealist — believed that it was too late in the world’s history to settle international disputes with bloodshed. He may have been the first resident of the Twilight Zone. He and Secretary of State James Madison reckoned that European nations needed the natural resources and agricultural products of the United States more than we needed their finished goods — so Jefferson persuaded a friendly Congress to pass a series of embargoes (beginning in 1807). They were severe in the extreme: nothing was permitted to enter American ports, and nothing was allowed out, period. Fortress America would weather the Napoleonic storm without going to war. Meanwhile. The U.S. would encourage domestic industries to ensure our economic independence from Europe, and we’d all learn to dress in homespun clothing as a demonstration of our national solidarity.

        Right.

        Modern use of embargoes, sanctions, and blockades appears on page one of the League of Nations playbook and its successor, the United Nations. The problem is, they never work — emphasis on never. No nation has ever been completely shut off from the commodities and supplies it needs to survive, and no nation has been persuaded to cease its hostilities. Sanctions and embargoes can make the life of a target nation more difficult, but complete success (that is, forcing a desirable change to abhorrent behavior) has proven elusive. The wars grind on, and the people (not governments) suffer.

        What have we learned about sanctions? Apparently, nothing. Not Cuba (1898), not Japan (1940), not South Africa (1987), not the Middle East, and not in Russia (again).

        I know … I talk too much.

        Liked by 2 people

      • peter3nj Says:

        Mustang, thanks for filling in the many blanks for us on our and other countries histories of tariffs and embargoes. I believe the saying goes “Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.” Meanwhile our erstwhile president repeatedly forgets which way to exit off the stage.

        Liked by 2 people

      • bunkerville Says:

        Thanks Mustang for the background… try try and try once more for a different outcome.

        Liked by 1 person

    • peter3nj Says:

      Mark
      My son was on tour with his band in Texas this weekend: Dallas , Houston and ending last night in Austin.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. peter3nj Says:

    Congratulations to the Italians for giving the finger to the EU mobsters. Meanwhile back here in the states, if we are to believe the polls, we can believe most Americans are oblivious to the perpetrators of our runaway inflation, the hi-jacking of all government institutions from dog catchers to election months ( I almost wrote the antiquated “Election Day”)to the Oval Office. What thinking person believes even the coming food shortages in concert with fuel shortages and an over abundance of cartel drugs and illegals and polluting the landscape will awaken Americans from their stupor. Meanwhile Newt Gingrich remains steadfastly on the red wave bandwagon. Newsome winning the presidency in 2024 is a safer bet than putting stock in Newts prognostications.

    Liked by 3 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      You never disappoint Peter in your optimism.

      Liked by 3 people

      • peter3nj Says:

        Well Bunks I doubt even NJ would send Uncle Festus to the Senate as Pennsylvania is prepared to do. At least our bald headed boob Booker wears a tie. Optimism is just a four letter word.,

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mustang Says:

      Yeah Bunks, Peter is a real optimist. He introduced me to a therapist to help me get over my depression of late. I turns out, this therapist is Peter’s cousin, Vinny. I’m not getting better, but I do get a nice discount on Vinny’s illegal drugs.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Baysider Says:

      Peter, it’s like getting slapped down by waves coming in sets too fast. You get numb and can’t stand up to it, especially after being trained to accept authoritarian abuse big time the last 30 months. Yup. They found out how far they can push – and it’s pretty far!

      Liked by 3 people

  5. Mustang Says:

    Transferring the rights of a sovereign people simply makes no sense to me, and in any case, is a dangerous course of action. As you pointed out, Europeans “transferred” their rights to German leaders on two occasions, neither of which benefitted in the least anyone in Europe except the German leaders themselves. I am very glad that the British woke up to the fact that the EU has become the Fourth Reich. I applaud the Italians and Dutch for “transferring their rights back to where they belong.” I also stand with Poland and Hungary. In their entire history on earth, no Germanic individual has ever had a good idea … a lesson everyone in Europe should have learned by now. Go Italy! I may have to buy a Fiat now.

    Liked by 4 people


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