Memorial Day Remembrance


These are American Cemeteries around the world and the number of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. I suggest watching this in full screen to appreciate the enormity of it all. Staggering.

We remember all those who have given so much so that we may have a day with friends and family.

“Hymn to the Fallen” by John Williams is the background music.

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Wishing everyone a wonderful day.

15 Responses to “Memorial Day Remembrance”

  1. geeez2014 Says:

    NOrmandy Cemetery gives you goose bumps…as do the amount of people always there walking around, finding graves, etc……….and there is the ocean in the not so far distance where all those ships arrived and boys had to jump into the water, the first line almost to a certain death. You may also go into a German bunker with a long horizontal slit where rifles were rested …and shot. Quite a place. Nice tribute, Bunkerville…thanks so much.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Mustang Says:

    Years ago, I stood on the deck of the USS Arizona Memorial. There were no words to describe it. After a small service, a gentleman standing next to me nudged my arm, and, pointing to one of the names inscribed on the bulkhead, he said the name aloud adding, “We grew up together.” It was as if someone had slugged me in the chest with a heavy instrument. You see the names, and you encounter indescribable sadness by the fact that some of those young men drowned inside that ship — but having someone tell you he knew one of those boys — history reaches out and slaps you. I’ll never forget it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Baysider Says:

    I notice one of the crosses bears the name of a captain in a Civil Affairs division. I may be wrong, but I think of these guys come on the heels of the combatants who have secured an area to stabilize it in terms of what the civilian population needs. There was no safe position.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Mustang Says:

      The differences in the size and mission of the Army vs. Marines more or less forced the Marine Corps into adopting the adage, “Every Marine is a Rifleman.” That is how the Marines think about combat, and it is how Marines are trained. Military occupational specialty doesn’t matter — every Marine, male or female, enlisted man or officer, private or general, pilot or staff officer … is first and always, a rifleman. Compared to the Marines, the U.S. Army is huge. But on those beaches in Europe, North Africa, and the Far East, our soldiers, no matter what their military occupation, learned that very lesson. Supply sergeants, radiomen, truck drivers, photographers, airplane mechanics, cooks, and medics … all learned that if you want to survive, you’d better know how to employ that rifle. The civil affairs men were always in danger of the enemy removing their uniforms and dressing as civilians, to infiltrate behind friendly lines — and those infiltrators were as (or more) dangerous than the front line enemy because at least you knew where those guys were. So yes, war is dangerous no matter where you’re standing. There is no safe place on the battlefield.

      Liked by 2 people

      • bunkerville Says:

        I had the same experience at the Vietnam war Memorial.. My friend took me there around 11 at night.. it was so hushed and the lighting just created such a mood. A man stood crying… with his hand on a name… we then walked over to the Lincoln… that was just such a moving at night. This was decades ago.

        Like

  4. Linda Says:

    Amen. Have a beautiful day friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ed Bonderenka Says:

    Somebody smart said at my blog, “It is our time now to pick up the flag and march forward. There can never be enough thanks to all who have served, and especially those who served and gave it all.”

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Always On Watch Says:

    Those rows and rows of crosses and of headstones never fail to give me goosebumps.

    Liked by 3 people


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