Netflix- their secret codes – find thousands of hidden movies

Netflix’s secret codes to their genres and sub genres to thousands of hidden movies that you otherwise will be unlikely to find. You will need a regular Netflix membership. It’s Friday, a holiday weekend and time to crank up the old T.V and take a look at streaming some great films.

In 2017 B-ville posted links to Netflix’s secret algorithms. By going to the link below and removing the XXXX and inserting the digits of your favorites genres, sub-genres out pops a list that you can’t come up with otherwise. It has been some years since the post. I checked out a number of codes and appears to be still working for the most part.

Interested in a good war movie and want to see your options? Log in and click on Military Action & Adventure (2125)

Netflix’s incredibly niche, personalised subgenres have long captivated movie nerds, from “Steamy Crime Movies from the 1970s” to “Period Pieces About Royalty Based on Real Life”.

The genres, based on a complicated algorithm that uses reams of data about users’ viewing habits to recommend exactly what a particular user is into, number in the tens of thousands.

How it works

If you’re logged into Netflix, enter http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/XXXX  but

“XXXX” is a series of digits – 1089 is “Mind-bending Movies”, for example.

Movies directed by Otto Preminger. 3000: Dramas Starring Sylvester Stallone. 5000. Critically-Acclaimed Crime Movies from the 1940s. 20000. Mother-Son Movies from the 1970s. There were a lot of blanks in the data, but the entries extended into the 90,000s.

Not all numbers will result in a subgenre, and given Netflix’s ever-changing algorithms, they might move around every now and then, while there may be regional differences meaning that some codes don’t work.

NetFlix streaming by alternate genres (main list) – I will make it easy! Click below:

If you have a few bucks to spare you can also rent an Amazon flick. One of my favorite war themed films is “Taking Chance.”

During a White House press briefing on Thursday, General Kelly — whose son was killed in action in 2010 — spoke about his personal connection with the 2009 film. Taking Chance tells the story of volunteer military escort Lt. Col. Michael Strobl accompanying the body of Lance Cpl. Chance Phelps back to his hometown.

“A very, very good movie is Taking Chance. Chance Phelps was killed under my command right next to me. It’s worth seeing that if you’ve never seen it,” he said. “That’s the process.”

Inspired by the true story of the United States Marine who volunteered to escort the remains of a nineteen year old soldier who was killed in Iraq to his small hometown in remote Wyoming, “Taking Chance” stars Kevin Bacon in the feature directorial debut of Oscar-nominated producer Ross Katz. Lance Corporal Chance Phelps (USMC) was just nineteen years old when he was killed during active duty. Now, as Lance Corporal Phelps is prepared for his final journey back home, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Strobl (USMC) (Bacon) makes it his personal mission to ensure that his fallen brother is laid to rest with the proper respect. As the journey begins, Lieutenant Colonel Strobl gains a greater appreciation of the sacrifices made in war than ever before. The film was selected for showing at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and premiered on HBO on February 21, 2009.

The trailer:

 

Watch Taking Chance | Prime Video – Amazon.com

 

Have a wonderful weekend.

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