A Man Reaps What He Sows


 

A Man Reaps What He Sows

by Mustang

Paul lectured us that the grace of God does not eliminate the principles of choice and consequence.  Every decision we make produces a peculiar result.  Some of these we can easily anticipate, if we exercise even a modicum of common sense — others are a bit more deceiving and, often, their consequences more severe.  The key to this is not lying to ourselves — particularly if we think that God will somehow excuse us from making poor choices.  If we think that, then we mock God, and this is a serious sin.

 

What we do in this life matters.  What we say matters.  The seeds we plant matters.  So, the question is, in matters of American democracy, what seeds have we planted?  We have planted the seeds of corruption.

 

Corruption is a complex topic; what makes it so is that corruption is often deeply rooted in our culture.  We see this in our political behaviors, and we see it in our “societal norms.”  The complexity of the topic may result from the fact that corrupt practices are difficult to quantify, and this is true because — in our multi-cultural society, corrupt practices vary from one ethnicity to another and from one region of the nation to another.  For example, if corrupt practices benefit us directly, we might assume that because they are beneficial, they are not evil.  If you don’t believe this, it is okay with me, but if you want to validate what I’ve said, just ask any Roman.

 

Corruption is destroying the American Republic.  The level of our corruption increases every year, and we are all so used to it that we give the problem very little consideration.  But make no mistake — if you think our government is corrupt, then you must be evil as well because it was you who helped shape that government.

This US Government Is The Most Corrupt In History | Mondialisation.ca

 

How bad is corruption in the United States?  To answer that question, one must consider its results.  Ask yourself about your well-being, how satisfied you are with life, how much you trust our government’s decision-makers, how much faith you have in our “hallowed” institutions.  What is the impact of corruption on our social development, economic growth, our quest for an egalitarian society?  If the question seems too broad, consider the effects of corruption on our political behavior. 

Why do we countenance a legal system that grants favoritism to the wealthy and influential — on drug use, for example — and a different standard to the poor black man guilty of the same illegal behavior as Hunter Biden?  One escapes official notice, even though the illicit behavior is well known, and one goes into prison for years.  Is this an example of an egalitarian society, or its opposite?  How do any of us justify it?  And, if we cannot abide by this blatant example of corruption, why do we allow it to continue?  How are we, a generally Christian society, able to ignore the crime of high-ranking politicians (McConnell, Pelosi, Schumer, McCarthy) and demand an accounting for the burglar or car thief?  It is the same behavior.  One generally accepted, one not.  Why?

 

If I’m wrong about this, please weigh in.  Tell me, where am I wrong?  How are modern Americans any different from ancient Romans, or how do we imagine that our society is in any way superior to that of the victims of Soviet society?

 

A final question: Why are we angered when we catch high-ranking officials stealing (John Kerry, for example, trying to avoid paying taxes on his yacht) yet continue to countenance his participation in the highest tiers of government?  Let’s not look away from the corrupt men who keep appointing men like Kerry, either.  How did Joe Biden, given all that we know about him in his public life, ever become President of the United States?  It wasn’t because Joe Biden is corrupt —  it was because WE are corrupt.

 

Mustang also blogs at Fix Bayonets and Thoughts From Afar

 

23 Responses to “A Man Reaps What He Sows”

  1. peter3nj Says:

    Off topic:
    John Kerry must be shaking in his loafers cuz Sen Grassley (R) is calling for an investigation into Kerry’s sharing american intel with the Iranians. There’s a better chance of Iran sharing their intel with our CIA than Lurch facing consequences of any kind.

    Liked by 4 people

    • markone1blog Says:

      I hope he creates friction burns on the inside of those loafers with all of that shaking. If one rocket flies into Israel or one bomb explodes in a U.S. base due to his loose lips, he would deserve anything coming to him at about 3k fps.

      Liked by 4 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      It wouldn’t take much investigation….. its been well known for years.. finally the media has picked it up… apparently with Trump quiet on the front they are having trouble with news days and finding news to report…..if only Liz could shut her mouth.

      Liked by 4 people

  2. markone1blog Says:

    I have taught third grade boys’ Sunday school for years and have touched on Galatians 6:7-8 a number of times and these are the things that come to mind from those discussions:

    You cannot plant corn and expect wheat to grow out of the ground. Likewise, you cannot be rude to someone and expect their worldly reaction to be favorable.

    When you plant a single heirloom variety seed, sometimes you will get a crop of 10, 50, or 100 seeds in return. Diminished return rarely happens when you need it. If you show hate, you will get hate.

    You don’t plant a seed and immediately get a result. Results come later — usually when the warmth of spring and summer are a memory and you are freezing your backside off. Whether you are getting pay-back from something that happened last week or last year, good and bad pay-back always comes later in life.

    Good things done for other people are like seeds that grow into friendships. Still, there is only one relationship that you cannot do without: one with Jesus. Accept His forgiveness and much will grow from there.

    Like

  3. bunkerville Says:

    I am in agreement on most of your points. I do take exception with your “But make no mistake — if you think our government is corrupt, then you must be evil as well because it was you who helped shape that government.” There are forces beyond ourselves which we know not. Others are evolved to where they are in this life. Most do the best they can. Taking on the judgement of others and placing it on ourselves is a road not worth taking. There were many who gave warning about the Fall of Rome. But that is the nature of civilizations. They come, they go.
    What came to mind was Obama’s remark that his salvation was dependent on others.

    Liked by 3 people

      • markone1blog Says:

        This (along with his statements on Islam) makes me think that Obama has no idea of how Biblical Christianity works.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bunkerville Says:

        Which is why I included in the premise of Mustang that we are culpable for the “sins” of our fellow citizens.

        Liked by 1 person

      • markone1blog Says:

        Agreed. Nobody can be held culpable for the actions of others.

        Like

      • peter3nj Says:

        Looks like the pot smoking and straw hat wearing in combination with having a run of the mill white grandma worked out just fine for the ne’er do well. Meanwhile he gives no credit to his pecan tan being halfway responsible for his not sharing the same fate as his homies in the hood after all.

        Like

    • Ed Bonderenka Says:

      I’m with Bunkerville on this.
      If I’ve done anything to enable the corruption in this government, I am not aware of it.
      OK, I once, as a youth, promoted liberal ideas, smoke dope, etc.
      But I have done a lot to combat that corruption.
      For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.
      I’m not excusing us by saying it’s beyond us, I’m saying that we will not win without a spiritual component.
      We must have another Great Awakening.
      America will have to be willing to give up her sins of preference and convenience to remove that corruption.

      Liked by 2 people

      • markone1blog Says:

        The corruption in government that we enable may not be very overt. It may be shown merely in the “gimme, gimme, gimme” attitude of both Democrats (with their social programs) and Republicans (with their set-asides for business).

        Still, what saves us is grace and, as you say, a turning from preferred sins.

        Liked by 3 people

      • nrringlee Says:

        Here is the bottom line for our Republic. Salvation or Bust. If we do not accept the evident truths before us, the Law of Nature and Nature’s God we will continue on a path of critical theory, the easy path, versus critical thinking, the hard path. Paul challenges us to decide well. Life is all about deciding well. Free will is burdened by our Original Sin. That battle is only resolved by thinking critically and deciding well. Far too many take comfort in the easy path. The path of ease, pleasure, indulgence and indifference to consequence. If one were to pick one term to define our current national character I would be tempted to pick ‘hubris.’ Politics reflects culture. It is no surprise to me that we pick leaders who best represent the worst of our culture. Salvation or Bust.

        Liked by 4 people

    • markone1blog Says:

      On one hand, I think that the grace of God (one of several forces beyond ourselves) is what has pulled America’s fat out of the fire a number of times.

      However, we cannot forget that we all sin (Rom. 3:23) and have a tendency to wander.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mustang Says:

      “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Whilst men are linked together, they easily and speedily communicate the alarm of any evil design. They are enabled to fathom it with common counsel and to oppose it with united strength. Whereas, when they lie dispersed, without concert, order, or discipline, communication is uncertain, counsel difficult, and resistance impracticable. Where men are not acquainted with each other’s principles, nor experienced in each other’s talents, nor at all practiced in their mutual habitudes and dispositions by joint efforts in business; no personal confidence, no friendship, no common interest, subsisting among them; it is evidently impossible that they can act a public part with uniformity, perseverance, or efficacy. In a connection, the most inconsiderable man, by adding to the weight of the whole, has his value, and his use; out of it, the greatest talents are wholly unserviceable to the public. No man, who is not inflamed by vain-glory into enthusiasm, can flatter himself that his single, unsupported, desultory, unsystematic endeavors, are of power to defeat the subtle designs and united cabals of ambitious citizens. When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.”
      —Edmund Burke, 1770

      What Mr. Burke told us 250 years ago is equally true today. Burke, as one might recall, laid the foundation for modern conservatism. I did not intend that my questions assail anyone, but rather to ask … given how the entirety of our society and its government has evolved over a very long period of time (even before anyone reading this was born), could corruption exist in the present without the consent of the governed? I keep thinking, if it is true that ten million, or twenty million “conservative” voters stayed home last November, then good men did nothing to prevent the triumph of evil.

      It may be too much to contemplate the tone of a national election, but we should certainly try to understand our own state’s politics. For example, how is it possible that Marxist Gretchen Whitmer defeated a conservative by as many as nine points to win the gubernatorial election? It was either that good people stood by and did nothing to stop her, or that the majority of citizens embraced the corruption of the political left. Neither of these possibilities in any way defeats my contention that if it is true that our body politic has become corrupt, such is only possible because the collective “we” have become corrupt.

      Liked by 1 person

      • bunkerville Says:

        “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” – While Burke makes a fine argument, the premise, while catchy, attempts to simply a question with many complexities.
        Perhaps when the issue you raised steered the issue more into the realm of “collective” guilt that you lost me. We are getting into the issue of “free will” … each person who voted or failed to do so exercised his or her free will. What they did or did not do has nothing to do with me.
        I could attempt to “steal” votes to get the desired result. There are many who believe that was the case this past election. Was that good men doing nothing? Rather was it our faith that others share our values of honesty and integrity?

        A good discussion with good questions raised.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mustang Says:

        A rebirth of the Federalist papers, perhaps? LOL.

        Liked by 2 people

      • bunkerville Says:

        That should do it Mustang… 🙂

        Like

      • peter3nj Says:

        “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
        Bbbbbut the good men and women in Washington along with many state governors are doing something about the rising murder rates along with other violent crimes. They are gearing up to take away legal weapons from law abiding citizens while hoping to one day eliminate the second amendment. Maybe Obama’s plan for a half a million or so brown and now pink shirted civilian army under the auspices of Homeland Security is the answer. With the treasury printing presses running 24/7 the cost would be negligible.
        Once only criminal gangs have weapons social workers hired by the USPS can fan out across the “hoods” and convince the criminals to behave. Problem solved….

        Liked by 2 people

      • bunkerville Says:

        Peter.. no doubt in their mind they are the “good men” and that is the nub of it.

        Liked by 2 people


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