Anne Boleyn now Black – New portrayal of history

 

Anyone who has been watching TV and Netflix has seen a dramatic change in the makeup of the cast who portrays various characters.  Commercials themselves have now become mind bending challenges to our cultural expectations.

This is a sensitive topic and I am sure this will be controversial. But since when did Queen Anne become Black? Are we to defy a reality that Anne just wasn’t Black? And for film? I give you a flashback as to how we got here.

More of the cancel culture? Is this the “history” of the future?

 

Variety can reveal the first look of “Queen & Slim” actor Jodie Turner-Smith as Tudor queen Anne Boleyn — the most notorious of Henry VIII’s wives, best known for her untimely demise by execution — in three-part psychological thriller “Anne Boleyn” for ViacomCBS-backed U.K. broadcaster Channel 5. The show wrapped production on location in Yorkshire in December, and is set to air later this year.

Produced by Fable Pictures and Sony Pictures Television, “Anne Boleyn” garnered headlines last year for Turner-Smith’s casting, which marks one of a handful of times a Black actor has portrayed a major royal figure on a British terrestrial broadcaster. More recently, Sophie Okonedo played Queen of England Margaret, who was married to Henry VI, in the BBC’s “The Hollow Crown.” She starred opposite Benedict Cumberbatch.

Flashback:

Oscars new requirements for ‘Best Picture’ – includes cognitive disability, deaf

This should insure mediocrity in the film industry. “People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing” counts for inclusion in the requirements to be in the “Best Picture” category. Apparently Walmart comes to the film industry.

The diversity and inclusion initiative has been a heavy focus for the Oscars the past few years, shown by the expansive membership initiative. Today, as part of the Academy Aperture 2025 initiative, AMPAS announced new representation and inclusion standards in order to be eligible in the best picture category.

For the 94th and 95th Oscars ceremonies, scheduled for 2022 and 2023, a film will submit a confidential Academy Inclusion Standards form to be considered for best picture. Beginning in 2024, for the 96th Oscars, a film submitting for best picture will need to meet the inclusion thresholds by meeting two of the four standards.

The diversity and inclusion initiative has been a heavy focus for the Oscars the past few years, shown by the expansive membership initiative. Today, as part of the Academy Aperture 2025 initiative, AMPAS announced new representation and inclusion standards in order to be eligible in the best picture category.

For the 94th and 95th Oscars ceremonies, scheduled for 2022 and 2023, a film will submit a confidential Academy Inclusion Standards form to be considered for best picture. Beginning in 2024, for the 96th Oscars, a film submitting for best picture will need to meet the inclusion thresholds by meeting two of the four standards.

 

At least two of the following creative leadership positions and department heads — Casting Director, Cinematographer, Composer, Costume Designer, Director, Editor, Hairstylist, Makeup Artist, Producer, Production Designer, Set Decorator, Sound, VFX Supervisor, Writer — are from the following underrepresented groups:

• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing

At least one of those positions must belong to the following underrepresented racial or ethnic group:

• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity

B2. Other key roles

At least six other crew/team and technical positions (excluding Production Assistants) are from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group. These positions include but are not limited to First AD, Gaffer, Script Supervisor, etc.

B3. Overall crew composition

At least 30% of the film’s crew is from the following underrepresented groups:

• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing

More at Variety

That is the best the swamp has to offer.

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