China’s real national debt: $46 trillion, 330% of GDP

 

While we are concerned with our mounting debt, apparently China is having its own financial issues. Recall how President Reagan outspent the Soviet Union in defense spending to their detriment as they attempted to keep up with us. It looks like things are not so swell over China way. With China, they have a population of over one billion. Should we be concerned about a restless unhappy population? I am no expert on China by a long shot. Will it end like the Soviet Union if the Chinese can’t get their financial ship in order? Will they become more aggressive if there is a financial crisis? Zero Hedge goes on in the link below regarding the censorship China is implementing concerning the bad financial news.

 

 

China’s Shadow-banking system is collapsing (and with its China’s economic-fuel – the credit impulse), it’s equity market has become a slow-motion train-wreck, its economic data has been serially disappointing for two years, and its bond market is starting to show signs of serious systemic risk as corporate defaults in 2018 hit a record high.

But, if you were to read the Chinese press, none of that would be evident, as The New York Times reports a government directive sent to journalists in China on Friday named six economic topics to be “managed,” as the long hand of China’s ‘Ministry of Truth’ have now reached the business media in an effort to censor negative news about the economy.

The New York Times lists the topics that are to be “managed” as:

  • Worse-than-expected data that could show the economy is slowing.
  • Local government debt risks.
  • The impact of the trade war with the United States.
  • Signs of declining consumer confidence
  • The risks of stagflation, or rising prices coupled with slowing economic growth
  • “Hot-button issues to show the difficulties of people’s lives.”

The government’s new directive betrays a mounting anxiety among Chinese leaders that the country could be heading into a growing economic slump. Even before the trade war between the United States and China, residents of the world’s second-largest economy were showing signs of keeping a tight grip on their wallets. Industrial profit growth has slowed for four consecutive months, and China’s stock market is near its lowest level in four years.

“It’s possible that the situation is more serious than previously thought or that they want to prevent a panic,” said Zhang Ming, a retired political science professor from Renmin University in Beijing.

Mr. Zhang said the effect of the expanded censorship strategy could more readily cause people to believe rumors about the economy. “They are worried about chaos,” he added. “But in barring the media from reporting, things may get more chaotic.”

More at Zero Hedge

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