In Search of Common Sense


In Search Of: Common Sense     by Mustang

Over the past several weeks, all of us have been subjected to a growing list of women who claim they are victims of improper sexual behavior by prominent men.  By ‘prominent men,’ I mean very rich and influential people in the government, media, and in the television and film industry.  By ‘industry,’ I do not mean to suggest that they produce anything worthwhile.  Equally prominent women have united around the hash tag ‘me too.’

In any case, the allegations are disturbing.  From news reporting and social media, one might assume that every other man one happens to meet on the street is a rapist.  No doubt such do men exist; I only wonder if the problem is as prevalent as the media would have us believe.  Moreover, I have to question whether the problem is as one-sided as the women (and Gloria Allred) would like for us to believe.

The accusations, by the way, at least so far, include actresses in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Russia —and one White House intern.  Recently, Hollywood actress Ashley Judd stated that masher Harvey Weinstein gave her this option: succumb to my advances, or I’ll rape you.  Judd, being an astute business woman, negotiated.  She decided to have sex with this man in exchange for opportunities to earn millions in the film industry.  If this account is true, then Weinstein was behaving like a pig —and if true, then what should we conclude about the behavior of Ms. Judd?

Yes, it is true that men behave poorly, but women behave badly as well.  Whatever happened to the option of refusing such advances? In other words, saying ‘no.’  Would Judd’s career have suffered?  Perhaps, but then these women ought to know that beyond a three-digit emergency number, there are hundreds of starving attorneys who would love to litigate such allegations —especially when the accusation involves massively wealthy and enormously influential men.

And then, of course, we have a woman who was paid to discredit the victims of sexual assault by Harvey Weinstein.  According to press reports, Attorney Lisa Bloom was paid by Weinstein to question the veracity of his accusers, often failing to reveal that she was on Weinstein’s payroll.  Who is Lisa Bloom?  She’s the daughter of Gloria Allred.

There is no excuse for men like Weinstein, but I ponder … perhaps actresses have been saying ‘yes’ for far too many years.  It could also be true that some women actually encourage or enable piggish behavior.  To me, solving this problem is no more than a matter of common sense, or in the case of women like Ashley Judd, skill as a negotiator and a willingness to acknowledge their own character flaws.

20 Responses to “In Search of Common Sense”

  1. Br Andrew's Muses Says:

    […] In Search of Common Sense […]

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  2. The Weekly Headlines – My Daily Musing Says:

    […] In Search of Common Sense […]

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  3. GP Cox Says:

    Common sense? hahaha Now that’s a blast from the past!!

    Like

  4. jtdorsaneo Says:

    I posted a “me too” on Facebook. I have been propositioned in the workplace and am lucky that ignoring my boss stopped him from continuing his harassment. Back then (early 1970s) it wasn’t talked about much. It never occurred to me to sue. Happy that things are better now and I agree that Hollywood types are just idiots for the most part. Hard to take most of it seriously.

    Liked by 3 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      “Me Too” yep… I ended up in Corporate Compliance and my boss got fired.. I risked it all and proud of myself. I was required to attend meetings at bars on a Friday night that were beyond raunchy. It wasn’t just this that got him fired but a good start to his “other” interests.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. geeez2014 Says:

    Oh my goodness! You’re writing here, too~~? Good job, Mustang, “Traveling reporter!” 🙂
    OKAY, as I read this, I suddenly thought “Odd, when corporate execs do this, or even their lowly minions below them, women sue immediately…” We’ve all heard that men literally can’t even admire a woman’s dress or shoes, or nice new perfume scent because they’ve been TAUGHT that in sensitivity training…their companies and they will get sued by women who take “I like your perfume” as a come-on. (go figure).
    SO, if women will sue for the slightest thing in ‘real life’….anybody have a guess for why they haven’t for SO MANY YEARS in the film/music businesses?

    MONEY and CAREER…..who can argue that? A secretary at a law firm can sue, get some good money, and get another job if she wants…a Hollywood debutante wants to be “A STAAAAR!” She won’t whine…she’ll give in….and get the job. OR say ‘no’ and be blackballed.

    Let’s all do the math. So who REALLY is to blame?
    I’m not saying men like Weinstein or others are decent…but the outrage is ridiculous, particularly from those very women who HAVE careers because they put out.

    Liked by 3 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      Sadly this is one big setback in the cause of women’s progress. Early on there were truly reasonable and legitimate causes to which I could subscribe as I have commented below. It makes a mockery of all those who fought so hard for the gains that were made.

      Liked by 2 people

      • geeez2014 Says:

        In the ‘biz’, the gains made are usually from sex, not talent….I guess who we must really admire is women who’ve made it without looking like Nicole Kidman or Catherine Zeta-Jones.

        Liked by 3 people

  6. Mustang Says:

    Years ago, I was involved in an investigation surrounding the deaths of two sailors who were struck by a train. Also involved in this incident were two Marines who, at the time of the train incident, had engaged in some push and shove with the sailors. At the point where the sailors tired of the abuse, they both leaped over a pedestrian barrier to confront the Marines and that is when they were killed by the speeding train. The underlying cause of this terrible incident was over-consumption of alcohol. It was simply a sad fact that because of intemperance, all of these young people placed themselves in grave danger; it was a situation that could easily have been avoided. I’m sure that there are dozens of such incidents every year; young people too inebriated to make a good judgment call about their circumstances.

    The point is that too often, victims place themselves in dangerous circumstances due to excess drinking. In the past, we learned about the so-called “date rape” cocktail. No one deserves this kind of predatory behavior and there are no dungeons too deep or dark to place perpetrators of this sort of thing. Bunkerville is right to observe that such men had mothers … who should have taught their sons to respect womanhood. On the other hand, when women themselves display unladylike behavior (I have heard some of the worst foul language from females over the past twenty years), they send a very wrong signal to piggish men. It all too often takes two, and as my grandmother used to tell me, two wrongs never make a right.

    What the American people want to see is justice. There is an axiom that goes like this: justice delayed is justice denied. That said, it is hardly justice to accuse someone of a crime that occurred decades ago, or which he or she never actually committed. Falsely accusing someone subjects them to severe mental and financial stress associated with “adequate defense” and in this sense, they too become victims.

    Who was it that covered up Weinstein’s behavior? The media has been celebrating homosexual and hedonistic behavior now since the 1950s. We cannot find a single “situational comedy” show on TV these days without at least one black, one Asian, one Moslem, one homosexual man or woman character, and a male character who isn’t comfortable with his masculinity. It would appear, therefore, that Hollywood’s message has been quite effective in changing American attitudes.

    I would have more sympathy for Judd had she taken appropriate measures at the time, but that isn’t what happened. What did happen is that she benefitted from a negotiated arrangement. It may have been a good business decision, but it was hardly the path that a lady would take. By the way, in negotiating her deal with Weinstein, Judd encouraged him to continue his unacceptable behavior. One consequence of this was that Weinstein molested other young starlets; Judd bears some responsibility for this.

    As Peter pointed out, we learned yesterday that Kevin Spacey sexually assaulted a fourteen-year old boy at a party some years ago. Spacey admitted it, claimed it was alcohol’s fault, apologized, and then announced that he is a homosexual man. Suddenly the pedophilia was forgotten as the MSM celebrated Spacey’s “coming out.” This should tell us all we need to know about the mainstream media.

    Liked by 4 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      While I agree that it takes two to tango…women often felt compelled to do what they had to in order to achieve their goals. Should only “the sluts” make it in Hollyweird? Of course not. But it has been one of the tried and true methods of getting to their goal. Should women be forced into making this choice? It is hard for men to recognize what it has taken for women to achieve success in many professions. My own parents who owned a resort also had a liquor license. But only a man could own one. My father had other business ventures. Often he was away. Had he not been there when an inspector came around, we would have lost the license and my mother in big legal trouble. I tell you this because it is easy to forget what it has taken and how far women have come in the last decades.

      Liked by 4 people

    • petermac3 Says:

      And now with TV as the ever emerging advocate and promoter of miscegenation what’s next to be celebrated as the next accepted norm on the cultural menu, beadtiality? Dogs and ferrets will be engaging legal representation when their human partners claim they were victims of unwanted sexual advances.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Brittius Says:

    Many cases involving allegations of similar nature, we would step back on it. How does any man defend himself, when the incident alleged took place a month, a year, a decade, ago? Unless there was a rape and the hospital obtained semen samples or there are obvious injuries, the case becomes frustrating.
    Too frequently, there were allegations involving intoxication. It does not condone bad behavior, but it does point to not knowing the limit and leaving or stopping. Same with narcotic involvement, the better answer is to stay away from drugs. Revenge also comes into play for numerous reasons. A relationship gone awry.
    Last, there is the courtroom. You put your heart and soul into a case and into making a good investigation. You dot the i’s and cross the t’s. You go over everything thrice so there are no loose ends. You have all the answers. You go to trial. What happens? Attorneys stay on the plaintiff’s head. Refusal to move forward. Case thrown out. Dismissed without prejudice.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. petermac3 Says:

    Excellent analysis Mustang. And now that the proverbial can of worms has been opened it would seem to be open season, for now, on the rich and famous as we are treated to a 30 year old allegation against the garden variety Hollywood liberal Kevin Spacey. But how long before this reaches pandemic proportions, how long before this trickles down to allegations of anti-social sexual allegations going back years or decades with male teachers, coaches, scout masters, doctors, fathers and other assorted male relatives in the crosshairs? We should all know by now social media has a voracious appetite….

    Liked by 3 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      It’s open season now on men. Only the beginning. Having said that, I saw much too much at the workplace to give men a total pass. Men didn’t have to play the game to get ahead.. too often women did. Perhaps its more of a statement of our society or the human condition. But I agree… this is a dangerous road we are going down that the media is more than happy to instigate.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Simply Linda Says:

    It’s women like Judd who cry wolf when her own life judgement calls come into question. (yep, I went there). Her standing up there saying things like, “I’m a nasty women” and then calling foul on whatever…nope, don’t buy it. Sorry…kinda like calling the kettle black if you ask me, but you didn’t ask me. lol You simply can’t have it both ways. What is that saying, Fruit from the posion tree?

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      As far as Hollywood is concerned, most know what they are getting in for in that business. On a larger scale, men need to zip it up and respect women. I have seen too much in the workplace to just pass this off on women. Mothers raise these men and they need to do a better job.

      Liked by 2 people


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