Sunday respite ‘The Night they drove old Dixie down’


The purge of any remnant of our history begins. The media, in a psychotic frenzy this week demonstrated their ability as the propaganda arm of the regime. The burning shall begin. “Gone with the Wind” soon to be banned. A few more as demonstrations of the absurdity of the week. Oh yes, and the “Right” is more dangerous than ISIS. But that is what this really is about. In today’s world the flag represents little about racism but rather represents a culture and way of life and independence that Progressives hate. No Sunday respite really this week. But I will enjoy this song anyway.

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), the majority leader, said Tuesday that a statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis should be removed from the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, where it sits just feet from a statue of Abraham Lincoln, whose election spurred the South’s secession.

Washington National Cathedral’s dean said Thursday that the prominent church needs to remove two stained-glass windows honoring Confederate generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee — and depicting Confederate flags, images that he said were installed with “good and noble” intentions but have no place in 2015 as the country faces intense racial tensions and violence.

National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said Thursday that “stand-alone depictions of Confederate flags have no place in park stores,” a local affiliate reported.

This is a song about a confederate soldier named Virgil Caine and his days in the American Civil War. It is a very emotional and haunting narrative and has always been one of my all-time favorites.

Virgil Caine is the name and I served on the Danville train

‘Til Stoneman’s cavalry came and tore up the tracks again

In the winter of ’65, we were hungry, just barely alive

By May the tenth, Richmond had fell

It’s a time I remember, oh so well

The night they drove old Dixie down

And the bells were ringing

The night they drove old Dixie down

And the people were singing

They went, “La, la, la”

Back with my wife in Tennessee, when one day she called to me

“Virgil, quick, come see, there go the Robert E.Lee”

Now I don’t mind choppin’ wood, and I don’t care if the money’s no good

Ya take what ya need and ya leave the rest

But they should never have taken the very best

The night they drove old Dixie down

And the bells were ringing

The night they drove old Dixie down

And all the people were singing

They went, “La, la, la”

Like my father before me, I will work the land

And like my brother above me, who took a rebel stand

He was just eighteen, proud and brave, but a Yankee laid him in his grave

I swear by the mud below my feet

You can’t raise a Caine back up when he’s in defeat

The night they drove old Dixie down

And the bells were ringing

The night they drove old Dixie down

And all the people were singing

They went, “Na, na, na”

The night they drove old Dixie down

And all the bells were ringing

The night they drove old Dixie down

And the people were singing

They went, “Na, na, na”

24 Responses to “Sunday respite ‘The Night they drove old Dixie down’”

  1. My Article Read (6-29-2015) | My Daily Musing Says:

    […] Sunday respite ‘The Night they drove old Dixie down’ […]

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      Thanks

      Like

  2. LadyRavenSDC Says:

    Reblogged this on LadyRaven's Whisky In A Jar – OH!.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      Thanks!

      Like

  3. Jersey McJones Says:

    The act of people tearing down the symbols of the Confederacy is proof that we are not purging our history but rather acknowledging it. It’s about damn time.

    JMJ

    Like

  4. Always On Watch Says:

    Bunkerville,
    Stopping by here to welcome you back to the blogosphere. I’ve missed ya!

    I am so dismayed that we are again back to all this fighting some 150 years after the war ended. Round and round me go. Alinsky is cheering, of course. So is Howard Zinn.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      Thanks for your kind remarks. I sure picked one heck of a week to re-energize. Round and round we go indeed. This is getting desperate I fear.

      Like

  5. the unit Says:

    Of course I remember the song. I could tell some stories from the Deep South from the ’40s and ’50’s, so I won’t. Just history you know, nothing important there. Just about black fellows, Charles and Joe and me @ four. Mom letting me ride to town on Joe’s one mule pulled wagon with corn, pears, and watermelons for sale. Trust we had. Ain’t none no where now. Nor maybe deserved. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • the unit Says:

      Just a little more detail. Charles road a Servi-cycle(between 1935 and 1960, Simplex made variations of the Simplex Servi-Cycle) with a milk carton attached above the rear fender. Delivered for businesses about town(my dad’s included), even banking. Honest and trustworthy, not stole anybody’s I.D or anything else. I learned a cultural lesson from riding to town with Joe. Don’t take a mule wagon to town, it takes too long to get there. Stay in school and get an education. I did but still strived to be as trustworthy as Joe, so one’s mama would let you ride to town with someone like Joe. 🙂 I should say that was in North Central Mississippi in ’46. All were really just folks, black and white, back then, world war just ended. Was easy to get along. Even later in the civil rights era, these were the people I knew. And in spite of all the race baiters today, I still know these good folks. Don’t live there any more. Northwest Florida Panhandle now. But still same kind of folks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • bunkerville Says:

        YOu have quite a history. The South is poorly portrayed by the left who enjoys fermenting discord.

        Liked by 1 person

      • the unit Says:

        Yeah. I don’t say my family, Charles family, or Joe’s ever gathered together, but we lived in peace in life, to each his own, not bothered by the other. Subsistence required that then, wood chopped for heat in winter, game for family food. And what we raised as well, chickens, a few hogs and milk cows.(Gramps did the hog business, brother and me milked, mama churned butter and fixed our every meal). Oh and the cat fish pond and frog leg gigging!!! No time to hate much. After we moved from the farm, I never had a friend whose mother had rung a chickens neck for supper like mine. Well that I knew of. Maybe they anticipated PETA coming along. 🙂

        Like

  6. Alfred E. Neuman Says:

    Reblogged this on The Lynler Report.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. petermc3 Says:

    Maybe our PC rapidly evolving socialist gov’t led by Obama and his fellow travelers should call for the ban on showing Dr Zhivago due to the negative light it sheds on the Bolsheviks and their revolution.

    Liked by 2 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      Excellent point. Certainly not PC these days

      Liked by 1 person

  8. geeez2014 Says:

    Bunkerville; I can’t believe you posted this song. I can’t tell you how many times I have, but haven’t for a long while. It’s literally one of the top 10 songs for me and The Band is a total favorite of mine. THANK YOU. This is the best rendition of this song EVER and a LOT of folks have done this. I’m born/raised in California (okay, Southern California, but….clearly I’m not a Southern girl!!) and this always brings tears to my eyes!
    “He was just eighteen, proud and brave, but a Yankee laid him in his grave” Grabs me every time.

    Liked by 2 people

    • bunkerville Says:

      They would have us forget. Glad you could appreciate my taste in music! LOL

      Liked by 1 person

      • petermc3 Says:

        Too bad it was later corrupted by the socialist Joan Baez’s crappy rendition in her effort to cash in on capitalism.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bunkerville Says:

        You are too kind to Joan. A Commie through and through. And what did she do with all her money?

        Like

      • petermc3 Says:

        True to her commie self she probably invested in the american stock market while leaving the proletariat of her songs to sell apples- read drugs- on the street corners of that same america she despises.

        Like

  9. Adrienne Says:

    No more rule of law, no more Constitution, and now, no more history.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      FINIS as they say as the book ends. And so it has.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Brittius Says:

    Reblogged this on Brittius.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bunkerville Says:

      Thanks again.

      Like

      • Brittius Says:

        You’re welcome.

        Like


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