Vet sought treatment for ‘Insomnia’, NY police takes his guns

So you took a Vicodin 15 years ago when you had some surgery? Great news, you could be considered a “Mental defective” by the office of Mental Hygiene in Suffolk County New York. A feel good story to get the New Year off to a great start.

U.S. Navy veteran and retired police officer Donald Montgomery is suing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and other officials after his firearms were reportedly confiscated by police after he sought treatment for insomnia.

Consider Nassau County, a populous suburban county eastof New York City. The Nassau  Department (ncpd) oversees the issuance of handgun licenses which must be renewed every five years. Last year, the ncpd added a new question to the application:

“Have you used or still use [sic]
narcotics, tranquilizers or antidepressant
medication? If yes, record
doctor’s name, address and phone
number, (attach).” A list of all relevant
medications is required.
In reality, these categories of
drugs—narcotics, tranquilizers and
anti-depressants—are so broad that
almost every adult could be identified
as a potentially dangerous drug user
through this question.

Read more here with what is covered and how it works.

Here we go with a prime example of how the Office of Mental Hygiene completes Gun Control.

It all started after Montgomery visited his primary care physician on May 6 and complained about trouble sleeping, the Daily Caller reported. He claimed to have been suffering from insomnia since moving from a different state. Montgomery then returned to the hospital again days later for the same problems, except this time he was diagnosed with “Depression; Insomnia” by hospital staff.

On May 23, Montgomery returned to the hospital yet again with the same symptoms. He reportedly stayed at the hospital for 48 hours voluntarily for treatment.

Under New York’s SAFE Act, mental health professionals are required to report patients who are determined to be threats to themselves or others. Regardless, the lawsuit claims the veteran was cleared.

“Patient has no thoughts of hurting himself. Patient has no thoughts of hurting others. Patient is not having suicidal thoughts. Patient is not having homicidal thoughts,” the hospital notes from the visit allegedly said.

Montgomery was said to be “mildly depressed” by hospital officials, but they found “no evidence of any psychotic processes, mania, or OCD symptoms.” The notes also asserted, “Insight, judgment, and impulse control are good.”

Still, Montgomery’s records were forwarded to Mental Hygiene Legal Service for further review.

The Daily Caller outlines what happened next:

Four days after leaving the hospital, New York State police sent a letter to the Suffolk County clerk’s office stating “has been adjudicated as a mental defective or has been involuntarily committed to a mental institution” and that he was prohibited from possessing any firearms.

The next day, Montgomery received a call from an officer at the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department informing him that his guns would have to be confiscated.

Montgomery says that on May 30, the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department showed up to his house and confiscated his pistol license and four handguns — Colt .38 revolver, Derringer .38, Glock 26 9mm, Smith & Wesson Bodyguard 380.

Keep reading…

%d bloggers like this: