Sebelius Exempts Health Exchanges from Anti-Fraud Standards

In an October 30 letter, Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Kathleen Sebelius revealed that the Obama administration has determined that programs created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are not federal health care plans. This decision, which flies in the face of common sense, exempts the Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) and state-based and federally facilitated Marketplaces from laws banning kickbacks and various forms of semi-legal fraud perpetrated by pharmaceutical companies and other interested parties. Why was this issue not raised at the hearing yesterday?

While the writer of the post I am quoting had the intentions to portray the Healthcare industry as – greedy and corrupt, the usual meme, the intention is missed entirely. The intention is to devastate Hospitals and physicians reimbursements. The Cleveland clinic has recently indicated it would not accept Obamacare patients and for good reason. They will lose money. The end game is bankruptcy forced on it by the regime.  No Hospital or physician’s group will be able to survive on the miniscule payments that will be negotiated. So it is Katy bar the door as our healthcare system becomes the wild west. Unregulated, lawless, and corrupt. Negotiating contracts and sending patients to those who could care less about the quality of service, just give them a few bucks. Drugs? Same thing. It’s pay to play on steroids the Chicago way. Our lives simply of little value. The end game? A Single Payer system that they so crave. They will implement the very evil they rail against. Here we go:

As the New York Times wrote November 4, “The surprise decision, disclosed last week, exempts subsidized health insurance from a law that bans rebates, kickbacks, bribes and certain other financial arrangements in federal health programs, stripping law enforcement of a powerful tool used to fight fraud in other health care programs, like Medicare.”

The Wall Street Journal pointed out that the anti-kickback rules “went into force in 1991 and broadly bar companies from making payments to beneficiaries or other firms to induce business paid for by Medicare and other federal programs. That could range from paying rebates to Medicare beneficiaries for buying specific drugs to paying physicians to refer their patients to a specific imaging facility.”

H/T and more at:Global Research

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